The Human Swarm by Mark W. Moffett audiobook

The Human Swarm: How Our Societies Arise, Thrive, and Fall

By Mark W. Moffett
Read by Sean Patrick Hopkins

Basic Books 9780465055685
15.44 Hours 1
Format : Digital Download (In Stock)
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The epic story of how humans evolved from intimate chimp communities into a world-dominating species If a chimpanzee ventures into the territory of a different group, it will almost certainly be killed. But a New Yorker can fly to Los Angeles--or Borneo--with very little fear. Psychologists have done little to explain this: for years, they have held that our biology puts a hard upper limit--about 150 people--on the size of our social groups. But human societies are in fact vastly larger. How do we manage--by and large--to get along with each other? In this paradigm-shattering book, biologist Mark W. Moffett draws on findings in psychology, sociology and anthropology to explain the social adaptations that bind societies. He explores how the tension between identity and anonymity defines how societies develop, function, and fail. In the vein of Guns, Germs, and Steel and Sapiens, The Human Swarm reveals how mankind created sprawling civilizations of unrivaled complexity--and what it will take to sustain them.

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Summary

Summary

One of Kirkus Reviews’ Best Books of 2019 in Nonfiction

The epic story of how humans evolved from intimate chimp communities into a world-dominating species

If a chimpanzee ventures into the territory of a different group, it will almost certainly be killed. But a New Yorker can fly to Los Angeles--or Borneo--with very little fear. Psychologists have done little to explain this: for years, they have held that our biology puts a hard upper limit--about 150 people--on the size of our social groups. But human societies are in fact vastly larger. How do we manage--by and large--to get along with each other?

In this paradigm-shattering book, biologist Mark W. Moffett draws on findings in psychology, sociology and anthropology to explain the social adaptations that bind societies. He explores how the tension between identity and anonymity defines how societies develop, function, and fail. In the vein of Guns, Germs, and Steel and Sapiens, The Human Swarm reveals how mankind created sprawling civilizations of unrivaled complexity--and what it will take to sustain them.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“A delightfully accessible and ingenious series of lessons on humans and our societies.” Financial Times (London)
"[An] enticing whirlwind tour of the fascinating patterns of behavior and structures of societies revealed through the varied lives of people and animals across the globe.” Nature
"The Human Swarm is a book of wonders.” New Statesman
“A delightfully accessible and ingenious series of lessons on humans and our societies.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
“This fine work should have broad appeal to anyone curious about human societies, which is basically everyone.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)
“Moffett argues his points well and provides a well-researched and richly detailed account of why societies have been a fundamental part of the human experience since our earliest ancestors…Highly recommended.” Library Journal (starred review)

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Mark W. Moffett

Author Bio: Mark W. Moffett

Mark W. Moffett is a biologist and research associate at the Smithsonian, and a visiting scholar in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. Called a “daring eco-adventurer” by Margaret Atwood, his writing has appeared in The Best American Science and Nature Writing and he has been a regular guest on The Colbert Report, Conan, NPR’s Fresh Air, and CBS Sunday Morning.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, CD
Category: Nonfiction/Science
Runtime: 15.44
Audience: Adult
Language: English