Survive by Mark Twain audiobook

Survive: Stories of Castaways and Cannibals

Stories by Mark Twain , Jack London , Herman Melville , Patrick O’Brian , and others
Edited by Nate Hardcastle
Read by Colleen Delany , Nick Sampson , Erik Synnestvedt , and Gary Telles

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6.33 Hours 1
Format : Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781593162740

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The stories in Survive are full of suffering: From the savagery of the Donner Party snowbound in the Sierra Nevada mountains during the winter of 1846, to the extreme hunger and brutal cold endured by Ernest Shackleton’s support team in Antarctica in 1915. Such suffering may be hard to listen to, but it engages us, offering glimpses of something essential. When the most basic needs become paramount, some people can achieve a kind of clarity. This clarity in turn can lead to acts of compassion and genuine courage.

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Summary

Summary

The stories in Survive are full of suffering: From the savagery of the Donner Party snowbound in the Sierra Nevada mountains during the winter of 1846, to the extreme hunger and brutal cold endured by Ernest Shackleton’s support team in Antarctica in 1915. Such suffering may be hard to listen to, but it engages us, offering glimpses of something essential. When the most basic needs become paramount, some people can achieve a kind of clarity. This clarity in turn can lead to acts of compassion and genuine courage.

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Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Mark Twain

Author Bio: Mark Twain

Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel L. Clemens (1835–1910), was born in Florida, Missouri, and grew up in Hannibal on the west bank of the Mississippi River. He attended school briefly and then at age thirteen became a full-time apprentice to a local printer. When his older brother Orion established the Hannibal Journal, Samuel became a compositor for that paper and then, for a time, an itinerant printer. With a commission to write comic travel letters, he traveled down the Mississippi. Smitten with the riverboat life, he signed on as an apprentice to a steamboat pilot. After 1859, he became a licensed pilot, but two years later the Civil War put an end to the steam-boat traffic.

In 1861, he and his brother traveled to the Nevada Territory where Samuel became a writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, and there, on February 3, 1863, he signed a humorous account with the pseudonym Mark Twain. The name was a river man’s term for water “two fathoms deep” and thus just barely safe for navigation.

In 1870 Twain married and moved with his wife to Hartford, Connecticut. He became a highly successful lecturer in the United States and England, and he continued to write.

Titles by Author

Author Bio: Jack London

Author Bio: Jack London

Jack London (1876–1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. Before making a living at his writing, he spent time as an oyster pirate, a sailor, a cannery worker, a gold miner, and a journalist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction writing. He is best known for his novels The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set during the Klondike gold rush, as well as the short stories “To Build a Fire,” “An Odyssey of the North,” and “Love of Life.”  He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as “The Pearls of Parlay” and “The Heathen.” He was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics, including The Iron Heel, The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

Titles by Author

Author Bio: Herman Melville

Author Bio: Herman Melville

Herman Melville (1819–1891) was born in New York City. Family hardships forced him to leave school for various occupations, including shipping as a cabin boy to Liverpool in 1839—a voyage that sparked his love for the sea. A shrewd social critic and philosopher in his fiction, he is considered an outstanding writer of the sea and a great stylist who mastered both realistic narrative and a rich, rhythmical prose. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick and the posthumously published novella Billy Budd.

Titles by Author

Author Bio: Patrick O’Brian

Author Bio: Patrick O’Brian

Patrick O’Brian (1914–2000), a translator and author of biographies, was best known as the author of the highly acclaimed Aubrey–Maturin series of historical novels. Set in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars ,this twenty-volume series centers on the enduring friendship between naval officer Jack Aubrey and physician and spy Stephen Maturin. The Far Side of the World, the tenth book in the series, was adapted into a 2003 film directed by Peter Weir and starring Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany. The film was nominated for ten Oscars, including Best Picture. He wrote acclaimed biographies of Pablo Picasso and Sir Joseph Banks. He also translated many works from the French, among them the novels and memoirs of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean Lacouture’s biographies of Charles de Gaulle.

Author Bio: others

Author Bio: others

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental
Runtime: 6.33
Audience: Adult
Language: English