Still Not Safe by Robert L. Wears audiobook

Still Not Safe: Patient Safety and the Middle-Managing of American Medicine

By Robert L. Wears  and Kathleen M. Sutcliffe
Read by Mike Lenz

Tantor Audio
7.21 Hours 1
Format : Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781705227541

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Still Not Safe is the story of the rise of the patient-safety movement—and how an "epidemic" of medical errors was derived from a reality that didn't support such a characterization. Physician Robert Wears and organizational theorist Kathleen Sutcliffe trace the origins of patient safety to the emergence of market trends that challenged the place of doctors in the larger medical ecosystem: the rise in medical litigation and physicians' aversion to risk; institutional changes in the organization and control of healthcare; and a bureaucratic movement to "rationalize" medical practice—to make a hospital run like a factory. If these social factors challenged the place of practitioners, then the patient-safety movement provided a means for readjustment. In spite of relatively constant rates of medical errors in the preceding decades, the "epidemic" was announced in 1999 with the publication of the Institute of Medicine report To Err Is Human; the reforms that followed came to be dominated by the very professions it set out to reform.

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Summary

Summary

Still Not Safe is the story of the rise of the patient-safety movement—and how an "epidemic" of medical errors was derived from a reality that didn't support such a characterization. Physician Robert Wears and organizational theorist Kathleen Sutcliffe trace the origins of patient safety to the emergence of market trends that challenged the place of doctors in the larger medical ecosystem: the rise in medical litigation and physicians' aversion to risk; institutional changes in the organization and control of healthcare; and a bureaucratic movement to "rationalize" medical practice—to make a hospital run like a factory.

If these social factors challenged the place of practitioners, then the patient-safety movement provided a means for readjustment. In spite of relatively constant rates of medical errors in the preceding decades, the "epidemic" was announced in 1999 with the publication of the Institute of Medicine report To Err Is Human; the reforms that followed came to be dominated by the very professions it set out to reform.

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Author

Author Bio: Robert L. Wears

Author Bio: Robert L. Wears

Titles by Author

Author Bio: Kathleen M. Sutcliffe

Author Bio: Kathleen M. Sutcliffe

Titles by Author

Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction
Runtime: 7.21
Audience: Adult
Language: English