Essays 10: On the Shortness of Life by Seneca audiobook

Essays 10: On the Shortness of Life

By Seneca
Read by Robin Homer

Author's Republic
1.15 Hours 1
Format : Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781982774790

On the Shortness of Life was written by Seneca around the year 49AD. He argues that we waste so much time because we do not properly value it. We expend great effort in protecting other valuables such as money and property, but because time appears intangible, we allow others to occupy it and take time away from us. Wise people, on the other hand, understand that time is the most valuable of all resources, and with effort can free themselves from external control to engage in meaningful introspection and create an intentional life. Seneca urges his readers to live in the present and adapt themselves to a purposeful life in agreement with Nature. Only by doing so, can one then truly unlock both past and future. The completeness of each present moment allows one's awareness to expand to the equal of that of the universe, and achieve true virtue and happiness. The statements which urge Paulinus to retire from public life are in notable contrast to Seneca's advice in his essay Of Tranquillity of Mind to seek public employments in order to render life attractive. However, in his related treatise, On Leisure, Seneca makes the point that there is no inconsistency and that one can serve the greater community in either or both roles Translation by John W Basore, produced by Vox Stoica Seneca's Essays Series: 1) Of providence – addressed to Lucilius 2) On the Firmness of the Wise Man – addressed to Serenus 3-5) Of Anger (Books 1-3) – addressed to his brother Novatus 6) Of Consolation – addressed to Marcia 7) Of a Happy Life – addressed to Gallio 8) Of Leisure – addressed to Serenus 9) Of Tranquillity of Mind – addressed to Serenus 10) On the Shortness of Life – addressed to Paulinus 11) Of Consolation – addressed to Polybius 12) Of Consolation – addressed to Helvia

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Summary

Summary

On the Shortness of Life was written by Seneca around the year 49AD. He argues that we waste so much time because we do not properly value it. We expend great effort in protecting other valuables such as money and property, but because time appears intangible, we allow others to occupy it and take time away from us. Wise people, on the other hand, understand that time is the most valuable of all resources, and with effort can free themselves from external control to engage in meaningful introspection and create an intentional life.
Seneca urges his readers to live in the present and adapt themselves to a purposeful life in agreement with Nature. Only by doing so, can one then truly unlock both past and future. The completeness of each present moment allows one's awareness to expand to the equal of that of the universe, and achieve true virtue and happiness.
The statements which urge Paulinus to retire from public life are in notable contrast to Seneca's advice in his essay Of Tranquillity of Mind to seek public employments in order to render life attractive. However, in his related treatise, On Leisure, Seneca makes the point that there is no inconsistency and that one can serve the greater community in either or both roles
Translation by John W Basore, produced by Vox Stoica
Seneca's Essays Series:
1) Of providence – addressed to Lucilius
2) On the Firmness of the Wise Man – addressed to Serenus
3-5) Of Anger (Books 1-3) – addressed to his brother Novatus
6) Of Consolation – addressed to Marcia
7) Of a Happy Life – addressed to Gallio
8) Of Leisure – addressed to Serenus
9) Of Tranquillity of Mind – addressed to Serenus
10) On the Shortness of Life – addressed to Paulinus
11) Of Consolation – addressed to Polybius
12) Of Consolation – addressed to Helvia

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Author Bio: Seneca

Author Bio: Seneca

Seneca was a Roman Stoic philosopher who lived from circa 4 BC to 65 AD.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction/Philosophy
Runtime: 1.15
Audience: Adult
Language: English