The Economists' Hour by Binyamin Appelbaum audiobook

The Economists' Hour: False Prophets, Free Markets, and the Fracture of Society

By Binyamin Appelbaum
Read by Dan Bittner

Little, Brown & Company, Little, Brown 9780316512329
13.31 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781478992653

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    ISBN: 9781549153310

A Wall Street Journal Business Bestseller In this "lively and entertaining" (Liaquat Ahamed, The New Yorker) history of ideas, New York Times editorial writer Binyamin Appelbaum tells the story of the people who sparked four decades of economic revolution. Before the 1960s, American politicians had never paid much attention to economists. But as the post-World War II boom began to sputter, economists gained influence and power. In The Economists' Hour, Binyamin Appelbaum traces the rise of the economists, first in the United States and then around the globe, as their ideas reshaped the modern world, curbing government, unleashing corporations and hastening globalization. Some leading figures are relatively well-known, such as Milton Friedman, the elfin libertarian who had a greater influence on American life than any other economist of his generation, and Arthur Laffer, who sketched a curve on a cocktail napkin that helped to make tax cuts a staple of conservative economic policy. Others stayed out of the limelight, but left a lasting impact on modern life: Walter Oi, a blind economist who dictated to his wife and assistants some of the calculations that persuaded President Nixon to end military conscription; Alfred Kahn, who deregulated air travel and rejoiced in the crowded cabins on commercial flights as the proof of his success; and Thomas Schelling, who put a dollar value on human life. Their fundamental belief? That government should stop trying to manage the economy. Their guiding principle? That markets would deliver steady growth, and ensure that all Americans shared in the benefits. But the Economists' Hour failed to deliver on its promise of broad prosperity. And the single-minded embrace of markets has come at the expense of economic equality, the health of liberal democracy, and future generations. Timely, engaging and expertly researched, The Economists' Hour is a reckoning-and a call for people to rewrite the rules of the market.

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Summary

Summary

Winner of the Porchlight Best Business Book of 2019 in Narrative & Biography

A Wall Street Journal bestseller

A Vanity Fair Magazine Pick of Best Books of 2019

Oprah Magazine Pick of the Best Political Books to Read before the 2020 Election

A New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice of the Week

A BookRiot Pick of Best Books to Read This Fall

A Wall Street Journal Business Bestseller


In this "lively and entertaining" (Liaquat Ahamed, The New Yorker) history of ideas, New York Times editorial writer Binyamin Appelbaum tells the story of the people who sparked four decades of economic revolution.

Before the 1960s, American politicians had never paid much attention to economists. But as the post-World War II boom began to sputter, economists gained influence and power.

In The Economists' Hour, Binyamin Appelbaum traces the rise of the economists, first in the United States and then around the globe, as their ideas reshaped the modern world, curbing government, unleashing corporations and hastening globalization.

Some leading figures are relatively well-known, such as Milton Friedman, the elfin libertarian who had a greater influence on American life than any other economist of his generation, and Arthur Laffer, who sketched a curve on a cocktail napkin that helped to make tax cuts a staple of conservative economic policy.

Others stayed out of the limelight, but left a lasting impact on modern life: Walter Oi, a blind economist who dictated to his wife and assistants some of the calculations that persuaded President Nixon to end military conscription; Alfred Kahn, who deregulated air travel and rejoiced in the crowded cabins on commercial flights as the proof of his success; and Thomas Schelling, who put a dollar value on human life.

Their fundamental belief? That government should stop trying to manage the economy.

Their guiding principle? That markets would deliver steady growth, and ensure that all Americans shared in the benefits.

But the Economists' Hour failed to deliver on its promise of broad prosperity. And the single-minded embrace of markets has come at the expense of economic equality, the health of liberal democracy, and future generations.

Timely, engaging and expertly researched, The Economists' Hour is a reckoning-and a call for people to rewrite the rules of the market.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Through an engaging discussion of how economists’ influence grew and spread, he shows how free-market economics evolved into an over-promising ‘affirming religion,’ only to disappoint too many of its followers and lead others astray.” Mohamed A. El-Erian, New York Times bestselling author
“Lively and entertaining…The Economists’ Hour is a reminder of the power of ideas to shape the course of history.” New Yorker
The New York Times financial writer maps the advance of economists in the sausage-making of public policy and sparking the inequity that plagues us today.” O, The Oprah Magazine
“His book is a marvel of popular historical writing, propelled by anecdotes and just the right amount of explanation but also impressively well grounded in the latest academic research by historians, sociologists and others.” New York Times
“A well reported and researched history of the ways in which plucky economists helped rewrite policy in America and Europe and across emerging markets.” The Economist (London)
“Provides a novel perspective on the conservative revolution that dominated the past half-century of American political history.” Washington Post
“The author, ably aided by narrator Dan Bittner, provides a lively history of how their policies have brought enormous wealth—to the few…Bittner is adept at conveying the author’s outrage and, often, his biting humor…Bittner’s voice is modulated so that the complex theories of influential players like Milton Friedman, Arthur Laffer, and Larry Summers seem digestible, even if their arrogance is not.” AudioFile
"A kind of ur-text, revealing the destructive role of centering economists in shaping public policy…The Economist’s Hour patiently reveals the many times and multiple ways they’ve had an outsized influence at key times and have steered us wrong. It’s a fascinating analysis.” Chicago Tribune
This thoroughly researched, comprehensive, and critical account of the economic philosophies that have reigned for the past half century powerfully indicts them. Publisher Weekly (starred)
“An entertaining and well-written look at how market-oriented ideas rose from the academy and transformed nations.” Tyler Cowen, author of The Great Stagnation

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Binyamin Appelbaum

Author Bio: Binyamin Appelbaum

Binyamin Appelbaum writes about economics and business for the editorial page of the New York Times. From 2010 to 2019, he was a Washington correspondent for the Times, covering economic policy in the aftermath of the 2008 crisis. He previously worked for the Charlotte Observer, where his reporting on subprime lending won a George Polk Award and was a finalist for the 2008 Pulitzer Prize.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, CD
Category: Nonfiction/Political Science
Runtime: 13.31
Audience: Adult
Language: English